**Built on an IRA Bomb Site** The grounds at 30 St Mary Axe where The Gherkin serviced offices stand today is the former site of the Baltic Exchange building. On April 10th 1992 an IRA bomb was detonated outside the property causing substantial damage to it’s Edwardian facade, three people were killed in the attack which caused £800 million worth of damage to the local area. Conservationists were keen to reconstruct the grade II listed exterior of the Baltic Exchange building but due to the large expense of renovations the property was later dismantled. The remains of the building were numbered and packaged and later bought by Estonian businessmen Heiti Haal and Eerik-Niiles Kross who have plans to re-construct it in Central Tallinn.

**Paving the Way for a Skyscraper Surge** Original Architectural designs for The Gherkin were rejected over height concerns. However when revised plans were submitted, English Heritage were put under pressure to lift objections and the project was eventually given the go-ahead. As a consequence a host of new skyscraper projects were submitted for central London including Richard Rogers’ 225 metre high Cheese Grater and the Renzo Piano’s 310 metre tall Shard of Glass.

**Unique Design** With its radical, Norman Foster design The Gherkin brought an unequivocal new look to the Capital. Born of architectural innovation and technological intelligence, the circular structure ensures an open, light-filled office space which, according to the Foster + Partners website: “resolves walls and roof into a continuous triangulated skin.” The building won the RIBA Stirling Prize for Architecture in 2005.

**Olympic Gold Standard** The unique design of The Gherkin building cuts a striking figure on the London horizon which has been embraced as one of the main focal points of the Capital’s skyline. The building’s public popularity has ensured that it has been prominently featured in the London 2012 Olympic advertising and promotions.

**Don’t be a Square!** Despite The Gherkin’s circular appearance all of the frames of glass are actually square apart from the very top section which crowns the building. The structure is clad with a whopping 24,000 square metres of glass, that’s the equivalent of 5 football pitches!

**Falling Glass** In April 2005 one of the building’s triangular glass panels fell 400 foot smashing on the plaza below and causing major safety concerns that further incidences of falling glass would occur. Luckily no one was injured in the accident and the building’s other 744 glass panels were fully inspected to check that it would not happen again. In 2009 Londoner’s had another lucky escape when a glass panel fell from the 17th storey of the 125 Old Broad Street building.

**Ear-Popping Technology** The high-speed lifts in the Gherkin can transport serviced office clients to their offices at a rate of 6 metres a second! The lifts can transport 378 people at one time.

**71 Double-Decker Buses** The Gherkin Building is made of 10,000 tonnes of structural steel; the equivalent of 71 double-decker buses!

**Best Seat in The Capital?** Not the tallest building in the Capital but arguably still offering the best views of the City, the unique design of the glass giant means that occupants get a genuine 360 degree view of the surrounding area. The serviced offices at the Gherkin are high up on the 15th, 28th and 29th floors offering truly panoramic views.

**Enviable Business Address** The iconic Gherkin building offers one of the most well-known addresses in the entire of the UK and is a top-of-the-line location for any business looking for the true X-factor in serviced office quality. Serviced office clients and their guests have access to the private bar and restaurant on the top floor of the Gherkin with its unrivalled views over London. For more information and to arrange a viewing at serviced offices at the Gherkin call 01932 834 720.

This article was written by Ceri Lenahan for the exclusive use of Nuclei Limited websites, please do not cut and paste this blog without the permission of the author.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *